Solomon and Sheba – Chapter 7

Yes I know, I’m skipping about and all for a reason.  I want you to get the full  flavor of S&S to see if it’s your cup of tea or java as I hope it is.  This novel has many characters, but only a few can be well delineated.  Those I only touch on will have enough meat on their psychic bones to let you know where they’re coming from.  There are wonderful black, white and couples of other races, happy and unhappy – and real.  I think you’ll  like the town of Marigold, Maryland on the Eastern Shore, its multiculturism and the striving of the citizens for a good life.  Sit back and savor it.  Read the prior chapters just under this one, all the way back to what S&S is about. This will be part of a series.   Happy reading!

Early December.  Dusk with an early moon.  Sheba thought the Chesapeake Bay had never been lovelier.  Greenish and rippling in the wind, that body of water had always been one of her favorites.  It was a cloudy day, warm for December and  she turned to Marty as they stood on the deck of Mark and Marguerite’s small yacht, The Heller.  “Hey, this is living,” she told him. ” I love being alone with you, but somehow I wish, too, that the whole congregation could come with us for a while, the children who need it most anyway.”

Marty nodded.  Right now he felt he only needed his wife; they should grab more time together with just the two of them. “I guess I hadn’t realized how tired I am. Last night’s sleep leaves me rested though.  It’s a good thing I got my Mother Vangie’s genes and her energy.”  Marty always seemed thoughtful when he spoke of Vangie. Read the rest of this entry »

Another Winner Lost to Us, E. Lynn Harris

E. Lynn Harris

I felt terribly sad when I heard about E. Lynn Harris’ death. I enjoyed his books so much and in the beginning started not to buy them because I didn’t think I’d be interested in the subject matter. He was truly a writer for all seasons. He gave us some of the most realistic portrayals of some African-American life and especially African-American women I’ve ever read. And his deep compassion was something I always marveled at.

I just wish we’d been told more about his last years, not just months, because everything seemed to be coming up roses, then he’s dead. Why? How? I’d like to know much more. He shared his life so freely with us and helped us live ours.

Read the rest of this entry »